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Here Are The Weirdest Laws In North Korea That Everyone Has To Follow

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North Korea is one of the most intriguing countries of the globe. Due to the nation’s isolation from the rest of the world, there are a lot of things that people just don’t know about it and the things that have been exposed are absolutely bizarre.

But since North Korea’s regime is an oppressive one, people live under very strict laws. While many of them seem just absurd, there are also the weirdest and the brutal laws that North Koreans are obliged to follow.

Goal Pong

Only a few people are allowed to have access to the Internet. The only people authorized to access the Internet are only the North Korean political leaders, their relatives, students of elite schools, and of course, the regime’s cyber-warfare department.

Vox

WiFi is just prohibited in North Korean embassies. In fact, the use WiFi is actually forbidden in all North Korea’s embassies of the world.

Goal Pong

North Korean Computers are not allowed to use commercial operating systems like Windows, Linux, or Mac OS. The only OS allowed to use is the “Red Star OS” which is developed (and controlled) by the state.

magazin.centrum.sk

Reading or owning a bible is illegal. In fact, in North Korea, freedom of religion does not exist, so if anyone is caught in the possession of a bible could be sent to prison or even receive the death penalty. The only person North Koreans are allowed to worship is the supreme leaders.

factofthedayblog.com

North Koreans can only wear hairstyles which are approved by the state. There are only 28 government-approved hairstyles for North Korea’s population: 10 for men and 18 for women.

Providr.com

The North Korean government mandates that all citizens must vote in elections. Though this might sound like something positive, there is one “small” detail: people have to vote for a certain person (Can you guess who?)

Unilad

Tourists must be always accompanied with government “Tourist guides” which in reality are government officials to watch over them and control the photos that they can take, the people they talk with, and the places they will visit.

Vanity Fair

Smiling or talking loudly are ultimately forbidden on the date of Kim Il-Sung’s death. Kim Il-Sung is portrayed as the compassionate founding father of North Korea, so it’s mandatory to show respect towards the first supreme leader during the date of his death (July 8) and at his birthday (April 15) which are considered national days of mourning.

Indiatimes.com

Anyone who is caught talking loudly, acting out or chewing gum near statues of the supreme leaders will be sent to the labor camps. People should show respect to the former supreme leaders in silence and while bowing their heads.

BuzzFeed

Female soldiers are expected to have an excellent performance during the military parades. So they receive a very intense and rigorous training besides of following very strict rules. Therefore, if anyone fails to march in unison, they could be sent to a labor camp as a punishment.

Unilad

If a person commits a crime then the entire family could be punished too.

Unilad

A person who wants to live in the capital needs first a permission of the government to do so. Since life in Pyongyang is considered to be much easier than living in the countryside, anyone who desires to move to the capital has first to receive government’s consent.

Indiatimes.com

Only approved male government officials are allowed to own a car and drive it. For that reason, North Korean highways look always empty and desolated.

BuzzFeed

TV programs are strictly controlled by the government. In fact, North Korea’s TV only offers 3 television channels which, of course, are controlled by the authoritarian regime.

Unilad

People who attempt to flee from the country are sent to labor camps or executed. As an authoritarian regime, the North Korean government doesn’t allow people to leave on their own free will.

Unilad

North Korean citizens are organized following a caste system founded in 1957 by Kim Il-Sung. Therefore, North Korean modern society is divided into three categories: the core, hostiles, and wavering. People who are considered loyal to the regime, are placed in the “core” group. The people who are considered not very loyal to the government are placed in “hostile” group. And the people who are considered undecided are the “wavering.”

Making international calls is illegal in North Korea. If anyone wants to make an international call must first ask and receive the regime’s permission. If a person is caught making an illegal call to outside the country, can be executed in the act by the authorities.

www.express.co.uk

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